Mercury Rev

Woodstock, NY

Since forming in 1989, Mercury Rev has made a career out of boldly exploring the fringes of artistic perception, channeling colors and sounds and visions that always seem just beyond our mortal reach. The Guardian hailed the group as “a rarity in indie rock: a band who have continually evolved their sound, pushing at the boundaries of what rock music actually means over 25 years, borrowing from jazz, funk, doo-wop, techno, folk and more along the way,” while Rolling Stone praised their “majestic chaos,” and the BBC lauded their “shimmering psychedelic pop, immersive indie-rock, [and] spectacularly engrossing passages of sumptuous instrumentation.” The band’s 1991 debut, ‘Yerself Is Steam,’ landed on Pitchfork’s rundown of the Best Shoegaze Albums of All Time, and their 1998 breakthrough, ‘Deserter’s Songs,’ was named NME’s Album of the Year upon its release. Major festival and television performances around the world solidified their status as that rare group capable of straddling the line between mainstream appeal and progressive musical and technological experimentation, but the band’s journey was also a tumultuous one, full of lineup changes, setbacks, and heartbreak. “We made a record in 1995 called ‘See You On The Other Side,’ and that, to us, was the gem,” reflects Donahue. “No one else seemed to understand it at the time, though, and looking back, I think there’s an emotional parallel between our experience with that album and Bobbie’s experience with ‘The Delta Sweete.’ Listening to Bobbie’s record and understanding the context, we could feel our own sympathetic strings being strummed.” Ultimately, ‘The Delta Sweete Revisited’ is about much more than recognition or reward. It’s a tribute to the enduring legacy of an artist who forged a path for so many to follow, a testament to the power of our connection to the music that speaks to our most intimate selves, a timely contribution to a dialogue about autonomy and equality that stretches far beyond the art itself. “When we heard the final playback of Bobbie’s songs with each of these women singing, we realized we were part of something much bigger than ourselves,” concludes Donahue. “As an artist, there’s nothing that tops that.”
Mercury Rev